A Farewell To Art: NY Eatery’s Big Picasso To Move

In this Sept. 4, 2014 photo, a man pauses to views Picasso's “Le Tricorne," a 19-foot by 20-foot stage curtain, that hangs in the lobby of the Seagram building, in a passageway connecting the two dining rooms of New York's Four Seasons restaurant. The pairing between one of the art legend’s biggest paintings and one of New York's most illustrious eateries ends Sunday, when the unusual artwork is to be eased off its travertine wall and ultimately moved to a museum, after a legal dispute that for a time split some of the city’s most prominent preservationists. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

In this Sept. 4, 2014 photo, a man pauses to views Picasso's “Le Tricorne," a 19-foot by 20-foot stage curtain, that hangs in the lobby of the Seagram building, in a passageway connecting the two dining rooms of New York's Four Seasons restaurant. The pairing between one of the art legend’s biggest paintings and one of New York's most illustrious eateries ends Sunday, when the unusual artwork is to be eased off its travertine wall and ultimately moved to a museum, after a legal dispute that for a time split some of the city’s most prominent preservationists. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

NEW YORK — For over half a century, New York City's Four Seasons restaurant has been a place where Picasso meets the power lunch.

But the pairing between one of the artist's biggest paintings and one of New York's most illustrious eateries is due to end Sunday. The unusual artwork — a painted stage curtain — is to be eased off its wall and moved to a museum.

In this Sept. 4, 2014 photo, Picasso's “Le Tricorne," a 19-foot by 20-foot stage curtain, hangs in the lobby of the Seagram building, in a passageway connecting the two dining rooms of New York's Four Seasons restaurant. The pairing between one of the art legend’s biggest paintings and one of New York's most illustrious eateries ends Sunday, when the unusual artwork is to be eased off its travertine wall and ultimately moved to a museum, after a legal dispute that for a time split some of the city’s most prominent preservationists. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

In this Sept. 4, 2014 photo, Picasso's “Le Tricorne," a 19-foot by 20-foot stage curtain, hangs in the lobby of the Seagram building, in a passageway connecting the two dining rooms of New York's Four Seasons restaurant. The pairing between one of the art legend’s biggest paintings and one of New York's most illustrious eateries ends Sunday, when the unusual artwork is to be eased off its travertine wall and ultimately moved to a museum, after a legal dispute that for a time split some of the city’s most prominent preservationists. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

As the curtain falls on the long residency of "Le Tricorne" (luh TREE'-cohrn), art students have come to sketch and visitors to snap pictures. Reservations have risen for the 1919 painting's final days at the Four Seasons.

"Le Tricorne" has been there since 1959.

The building's owner has said the 19-by-20-foot curtain needs to be removed for repairs to the wall behind it.

By JENNIFER PELTZ — Sep. 6, 2014 12:33 PM EDTAP

 
 

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